Category Archives: 2013-02-18 to 2013-03-03 – Mighty Bone

Wild

Day 3

I’ve managed to fashion a crude quill using a feather from one of the beasts. Its mane is spread and spiky, and its call sends chills down my spine. But when it sleeps, it sleeps deep. I broke its neck quickly, silently, and pulled it back to my cave before I was spotted. The meat did not agree with me.

3rd June

Sectors 1, 2, and 4 report nothing unusual.
Sector 3 reports loss of another peacock. Three replacements ordered: two peacocks and one gameskeeper. Usual severance package supplied.

Day 12

I try to sleep when the burning ball comes out, but it’s becoming dangerous. The monkeys prowl around, poking at things. Poking at my things.

I don’t like the way they move. All jittery and stuttery. I will take one down before the end of this cycle. I will kill it and post it as a warning for the others.

June 15th

Sectors 1, 2, and 4 report nothing unusual.
Sector 3 reports loss of more wildlife. Fire broke out on Tuesday, contained by rapid response.
Oh, and three rangers found dead, skinned, and hung from trees.

Day 24

Too many. I ate too many. Mushrooms and meat and leaves and flowers that sting. I seem to be leaking, and I can’t make it stop.

July 7th

Sectors 1 and 4 report nothing unusual.
Sector 2 reports minor damage to some enclosures.
Sector 3 reports discovery of hollowed out tree. Dead body inside. Trunk covered with indecipherable scribble. Three tubs of prescription medication, unopened.
Construction has begun on Sector 5.

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Exhibit 438

The small knuckle bone in this display case seems an unlikely candidate; but many have described it as the most significant scientific find of all time.
The bone came out of a dig near Tehran in the late 80′s but sat in a cupboard in Harvard’s anthropology department for three decades before its  significance was understood.   Jeffery Muffin,  a graduate student who was doing a detailed analysis of the fossilized stomach contents of early hominids,  was the first to examine the bone under a microscope and discovered its extraordinary internal structure.
The bone is thought to be the last segment of a finely-jointed probing appendage. Ventral striations near the end of the bone indicate the bone was traumatically severed,  most probably bitten off, just above the first joint.
The bone remains the only conclusive evidence of extraterrestrial life; who they were and what they were doing we may never know.  But we do know that they visited our world and walked among our hominid ancestors; and that all they left behind was a severed fingertip.

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